Referenten der Herbsttagung in Weimar 2007

Thomas Kullmann

Biographie

Prof. Dr. Thomas Kullmann, Jahrgang 1960, ist seit 2002 Professor für Anglistik (Literaturwissenschaft) an der Universität Osnabrück. Vorher war er als Privatdozent und Professor an den Universitäten Heidelberg, Aachen und Göttingen tätig. Seine Interessenschwerpunkte sind die Literatur und Kultur der englischen Renaissance (mit Schwerpunkt Shakespeare), die Literatur und Kultur des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts und die englische Kinder- und Jugendliteratur. Er veröffentlichte unter anderem die Bücher „Abschied, Reise und Wiedersehen bei Shakespeare: Zu Gestaltung und Funktion epischer und romanhafter Motive im Drama“ (Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1989), „Vermenschlichte Natur: Landschaft und Wetter im englischen Roman von Ann Radcliffe bis Thomas Hardy“ (Tübingen: Niemeyer 1995) und „William Shakespeare: Eine Einführung“ (Berlin: Erich Schmidt, 2005). Der letztgenannte Band erschien in der Reihe „Grundlagen der Anglistik und Amerikanistik“.

Michael Neill

Vortrag “'Probable and palpable to thinking': interiority, colour and the lying body in Othello”

Michael Neill
Michael Neill

Unlike tongues, bodies, we think, cannot lie; and the face, as the body’s most eloquent surface, is often credited with similar truthfulness -- the eyes, for example, being seen as ‘windows to the soul,’ offering unmediated access to the inner self.  Yet, as often as we assume the communicative transparency of faces, we can be troubled by their seeming opacity: indeed there is a whole somatic vocabulary – 'putting a good face on matter', 'saving face', 'on the face of things'—that imagines the human countenance as a kind of mask, as though 'visage' and vizard' were one and the same. It is not for nothing that Renaissance drama's the most famous alliance in fraud links two characters named Subtle and Face; and Shakespeare's writing exhibits an especially tormented preoccupation with the contradictory semiotics of the face.  In this paper I explore the dramatist’s preoccupation with enigmatic surfaces as a starting point for rethinking the significance of colour in Othello, a play obsessed with the decoding of bodily signals.

Lena Cowen Orlin

Biographie

Lena Cowen Orlin
Lena Cowen Orlin

Lena Cowen Orlin is Visiting Professor of English at Georgetown University for 2007-08, Presidential Research Professor of English at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and Executive Director of the Shakespeare Association of America.  Her new book, forthcoming this year from Oxford University Press, is Locating Privacy in Tudor London.  She is also the author of Private Matters and Public Culture in Post-Reformation England (Cornell University Press, 1994) and editor of Elizabethan Households: An Anthology (Folger Shakespeare Library, 1995),  Material London, ca. 1600 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000), New Casebooks Othello: Contemporary Critical Essays (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003), and Center or Margin: Revisions of the English Renaissance in Honor of Leeds Barroll (Susquehanna University Press, 2006).  She is co-editor, with Stanley Wells, of Shakespeare: An Oxford Guide (Oxford University Press, 2003).  Her current projects include a new Sourcebook for English Studies for Palgrave Macmillan and a Collected Works of Shakespeare for Bedford Books.